the instruments Introduction

 

The following selection introduces some of the most representative instruments in a Near East music ensemble; cellos and double basses are also often used. Included are short taqsm (improvisations). During a taqsm (singular of taqsm), the instrumentalist improvises according to a complex set of preestablished rules and conventions. Individual taqsm commonly last from three to five minutes but their length may vary depending on the amount of time alotted to the performer, as well as on the performer's mood.
A taqsm is multi-sectional, with phrases separated by moments of silence. The entire taqsm is a gradual unfolding of the unique characteristics of a specific mode. Generally, such unfolding follows an ascending progression, with the musician often beginning at the bottom of a modal scale and slowly working up to the higher notes. Modulating to other maqmt (modes) in a single taqsm is very common as is the eventual and obligatory return to the maqm with which the taqsm began.
The various sections of a taqsm generally end with stylized cadential phrases called qaflt, a source of particular enjoyment for the audience. The taqsm genre gives instrumentalists the opportunity to show their abilities and sensitivities both as performers and composers. Listeners appreciate and judge the overall structure of a taqsm, the performers' ability to bring the improvisations to effective resolutions, their use of silence and modulation, their knowledge of the various maqmt, and their technical mastery of their instrument. Inspired performances may evoke a profound feeling of ecstasy within the listeners.
(The term taqsm is not used to describe improvised rhythmic variations performed on percussion instruments)
  

'd
'd
Buzuq
Buzuq
Kamn
Kamn
Qnn
Qnn
Ny
Ny
Mijwiz
Mijwiz
Tablah
Tablah
Riqq
Riqq
Tr
Tr

 

Introduction The Director Metric and Melodic Modes The Rehearsal The Performance